1. A $20 ODSC-ADV membership is now available as an alternative to the standard $65 ODSC-OFTR membership, details via the JOIN button
  1. twobone

    twobone Limited User

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    Sorry, a bit of a rambling post here...I'm struggling with the two halves of my brain - logic versus emotion.

    Since I was a kid I've always wanted to own a motorcycle. After doing some light trail riding I've been planning on getting prepped for next season with a 250 DS bike and full safety equipment along with a proper riding training program. My goal would be to focus on gravel road riding to stay away from traffic along with trail only riding.

    Recently I made the mistake of reading some ADVrider posts on accidents. Many of them seem fairly innocuous in terms of how they happened (running wide or being forced off a corner and heading into a ditch), but the outcome is often fatal or seriously life changing especially in terms of brain injury.

    Perhaps the answer lies in being super mindful of where and when I ride, keep the pace down and focus more on trail versus road. I just know that I'm going to keep struggling with this "get a bike" itch until I do it. I'm turning 50 next year so the window isn't getting wider.

    Hope I'm not wasting anyone's time with my own internal debate.
  2. FLSTC

    FLSTC Limited User

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    Advice:
    Get decent gear - helmet, boots, chest/elbow/knee armor, maybe a neck brace.
    Take some training courses (trail tours)
    Ride within your skill/comfort - don't take excess risks just to keep up with others
    Improve your health/fitness/resilience. weight training / muscle - reduce risk of injuries when you do fall off the bike
    Blackdog likes this.
  3. Neil Edmunds

    Neil Edmunds ODSC Executive

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    ADV rider is a great resource, it really opens your mind to all the possibilites of what you can do and where to do it in terms of adventure riding. Don't expect to just jump on and go. Most of us have been riding a long time (I started in the 60s) and have learned the risks and rewards. That said, just start with training and local riding, preferrably offroad. Consider other riding after you get more skill.

    Motorcycles are not seen by other road users so the risk is high. Buy good gear and get it in high visibilty colours if available. Fit your bike with better lighting so you might be seen, but ride assuming you are invisible. Your struggle to decide on getting a bike is the right way, it means you are acknowledging the potential risk. I trail ride because it's great exercise and it keeps me away from the "texting morons" in cars.
  4. Algee

    Algee Limited User

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    Watch the video "why ride a motorcycle" on eveRide.org
  5. twobone

    twobone Limited User

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    Well put
  6. GQelements

    GQelements ODSC-OFTR Member

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    It's not a SAFE hobby, no matter how you slice it, but there are more dangerous options out there too...

    Gear-up, take precautions and don't go out to be a hero. Beat advice I was offered is try to think ahead...

    What happens if:
    That car does not see me...
    I blow that corner...
    There is a ditch past that crest...
    There is a rider or an ATV incoming around that bend....

    ...if you ride with that in mind you can still have lots of fun but reasonably maximize your chances of staying safe.
    wheinle likes this.
  7. Rob Woods

    Rob Woods Limited User

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    You don't want to live forever do ya? Get the bike!
  8. tricky55+

    tricky55+ ODSC-OFTR Member

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    Free advice is worth exactly what you pay for it, but if you still want some, I will offer a "hell ya" in favour of getting started, but only if you have some of the spirit that is conveyed in Rob's statement.
    I am a bit concerned that your approach to motorcycling is to first study accident statistics or accident scenarios. Motorcycling is inherently dangerous (compared to bowling). Don't take it up if you are generally risk adverse or don't heal well. Also, staying off road is safer than dual sporting.
  9. 3BeeJay3

    3BeeJay3 ODSC Past President

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    The best thing anyone can do IMO is to wear lots of gear & take some good offroad training courses. Then practice what you were taught, over and over and over. High skill levels, along with riding within those skill levels will do more to prevent an injury than just about anything alse. Those offroad skills will also make you a waaaay better street rider. The next best thing is to trail ride as much as possible.
    I rarely ride on the road because I find it too boring, distracting and full of clods in cars etc.
    twobone and Blackdog like this.
  10. Blackdog

    Blackdog Limited User

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    If you become a decent trail/dirt rider you will worry less about driving on road. As others have mentioned off road riding has much to do with managing the risk to a level that you are personally comfortable with. You don't nessessarily have to ride on the edge all the time to enjoy riding. With experience you can also learn how to avoid injury when you do crash. Like many riders I have had dozens of minor spills and mishaps over the years and countless close calls. Two years ago I lost control of my KTM 530 in the Gannaraska Forrest and crashed hard. Blew my right knee out, dislocated right shoulder and my head hit pretty hard. Completely avoidable crash. I was riding that day way beyond my skill level on a very powerful bike. Managed to get the bike up right and was able to ride home on pavement and get to a hospital. Despite a long recovery, I have been riding almost the entire time. Since then I have toned it down several notches and still love to ride. My new rule is to keep at least one wheel on the ground at all times ! Hope you decide to ride. It's a great sport at any age. I'm also 50 plus and intend to ride until my body fails.
    Last edited: Nov 13, 2017
    Mandryk and twobone like this.