1. A $20 ODSC-ADV membership is now available as an alternative to the standard $65 ODSC-OFTR membership, details via the JOIN button
  1. clayfan

    clayfan Limited User

    Messages:
    279
    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2006
    Likes:
    0
    Town:
    Niagara Region
    Weight is a bigger issue than the length or height IMO.

    I have an older 6x12 Pace Flat nose steel frame. 16 MPG with 3 bikes and TONS of gear for a race weekend.

    Saying that I have a buddy that has a new 7x22 Aluminum tandem axle rig , Rubber floor, 120V light system, Alum Cabinets upper and lower at the front.

    Took that trailer down to Unadilla for the GNCC last Sept with 3 bikes and 1 quad, generator, cook stoves, BBQ's and all kinds of other stuff for a 3 day race weekend and got 16 MPG towing all that.

    Nice trailer but kinda big. If I was to buy new, I'd go Aluminum, V-nose, 6x12 (or better yet 7x12) Torsion axle, barn rear doors, RV door the side with a screen door, 120V lights and Gen plug on the outside and figure a way to hang 2 bunks for sleeping.
  2. gybeman

    gybeman Limited User

    Messages:
    2,311
    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2003
    Likes:
    0
    Town:
    Somewhere
    I sold my steel framed Pace and have a slightly smaller custom alloy one that I will be picking up in the next week or two. (out your way Scott, so may drop by but not picking up any new bikes yet)
    Sold it for the same reason... gas mileage got worse in wind or higher speeds. But our v8 still got 17- 20+mpg depending on if it was fully loaded in the mountains with 2 bikes (one street bike) or with normal loads in the flatlands. But I towed the same size trailer with a v6 and got closer to 15 or less. A gas v6 these days normally has max torque in the 4k rpm range vs 2k for the v8.

    The new on is 6" shorter height wise than the last more than full head room one, has a one piece rounded roof (not flat with tin can on top), rounded side and front roof corners , 16" centres, and even though its a 6x10 the square floor space is only about 4" shorter than the old 6x12. I'll report back when I get it. Oh yeah, its about 300lbs lighter too.
    I have a bumper carrier for the light days but I doubt I'll go back to an open trailer with 10 or 12" wheels and crap bearings and tires that are iffy above 100kph.
  3. gybeman

    gybeman Limited User

    Messages:
    2,311
    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2003
    Likes:
    0
    Town:
    Somewhere
    Well weight definitely makes a difference. Just picked up the 6x10 alloy trailer and although its only 2" less height than my other one (just enough head room to fully stand up between the roof rafters), and the overall length is less than 1' shorter, the tongue weight alone is a huge difference. Its gotta be 100lbs less on the tongue (real easy 2 handed lift) and theres still enough room to centre the bikes over the axle. Most notable improvement is accelerating and braking. Gas mileage seems a bit better. I typically get high 15ish L/100km towing at hwy speeds empty or loaded normally, and averaged 13.8 with some added city driving and a fair bit of stop and go on the 401, and a pretty brisk side wind. (vs 10.9 without trailer)
    You still hit the aerodynamic wall above 100-110 where gas mileage suffers exponentially if theres any wind at all, but it seems better on the hwy and quite a bit better at 80-90 on back roads.
    ps - Scott, I think a 5 or 5.5' 5x8 would be great for 2 offroaders, or 1 street bike if you don't mind ducking while loading and putting some of the other stuff in the vehicle.

    Attached Files:

  4. nokturnal

    nokturnal Limited User

    Messages:
    90
    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2010
    Likes:
    2
    Town:
    Uxbridge
    I bought a 5x8 flat front. A trailer salesman (not the guy I bought it from) told me that the v nose can handle unpredictably in wind. A flat front may be SLIGHTLY less efficient, but is more stable. I was also told that the frame of an alloy trailer can be bent relatively easily in a minor mishap (not sure what this would be).

    I would love an extra foot of width. A 5x8 is very tight with 2 sport bikes. Hopefully dirt bikes will be an easier fit, though the wide bars have me worried. A 6x10 would be the ideal two bike (and accessories) hauler if you have the driveway space.

    I do love my ramp door.
  5. gybeman

    gybeman Limited User

    Messages:
    2,311
    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2003
    Likes:
    0
    Town:
    Somewhere
    Can't see it doing anything unpredictable unless the axle isn't in the right spot. I've had both flat and V's in lots of wind and neither 6' have done anything bad. Boy, 2 sport bikes would be tight in a 5'. One facing forward, the other back I would imagine ??
    The salesman must have been just selling flat front trailers or didn't make as much on the V's. If anything, the steel ones twist way more and would bend easily while the alloy ones are more susceptible to cracking, which is why I got mine with 16" centres instead of the usual 24.
  6. nokturnal

    nokturnal Limited User

    Messages:
    90
    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2010
    Likes:
    2
    Town:
    Uxbridge
    like i said, he was not selling me anything (so had no motive).

    yep, one front one back.
  7. Firepro

    Firepro Limited User

    Messages:
    24
    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2011
    Likes:
    0
    Hey Scotty, Go with a 6x12 aluminim with V nose. It will give you 12' up the center, cut the weight down and the v nose will definately help cut the wind behind the dakota. With the dakota being smaller its not breaking the air resistants before it hits that flat nose, in this case the V nose will make a big difference. My 7.5'x24' travel trailer tows easier at highway speeds then my 6x10 enclosed with the flat nose because it has a slope to the front of it to help the wind get buy it. Gas mileage is about the same but the travel trailer weights about 5000lbs loaded! I have also towed a drive through 24' snowmobile trailer with the major V nose to quebec and it got better gas mileage then my little 6x10! Behind certain vehicles a V nose makes a big difference, I would think yours would be one of them. Last remark if all you are going to tow in the trailer is bikes get a leaf spring axle instead of torsion. Torsions do not work well with a light load, they work there best when they are loaded just by the nature of their design. They down flex much with one bike in there and the trailer becomes really "hoppy" I have torson on my 6x10 and would not do it again for just hauling bikes. It needs about 1500-2000lbs before the ride of the trailer smooths out. YOu would really notice the hopping or bouncing more behind the dakota.

    Trailer dealer in Norwich had the Forest River Lightning all aluminum V nose 6x10 for about $3,500 bucks I think. When my old enclosed final gives up this is the rought I'm going I think.
  8. michel mondou

    michel mondou ODSC President

    Messages:
    1,130
    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2005
    Likes:
    111
    Town:
    Cambridge
    The practical solution to a bouncy trailer is to air down the tires a few lbs...It will smooth right out.

    Michel
  9. Firepro

    Firepro Limited User

    Messages:
    24
    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2011
    Likes:
    0
    This is true if you are using radial tires on your trailer, as the side walls were designed to flex in this manor. But if you are using bias ply (standard trailer tires) you will be setting yourself up for failure. I learned the hard way with my bass boat on highway 400. I ran the tires a little softer (about 5psi less) to take some of the shock out of the trailer when hitting bumps. I had both of those tires fail within 100 km of each other and completely blow apart when they did. I was informed by the tire shop that bias ply tires are meant to be run at there recommended psi and nothing less. A bias ply tire is not designed to have the side wall flex and allowing it to flex will eventually cause the tire to become "unglued" as you are flexing the bias joint, plus having less air in the tire will cause more heat build up which is another bad thing for bias ply tires. I have since checked this out with multiple tire places and they have all agreed. Bias ply tires are made to carry weight not give a smooth ride and should not be run under inflated.

    The problem with torsion is it is a piece of rubber between to pieces of metal. If it has been designed to flex at 3500# then by nature it will not flex much a 1000#. When it doesn't flex the trailer will just hop. Radial tires will soften the hop but its still mostly likely going to bounce around a little unless the tow vehicle is close to its maximum tung weight then it will bounce your tow vehicle instead of hopping the trailer. Either way not much fun.

    I love the way my torsion axles pulls when it is loaded near its max for work. But I absolutely hate the way it pulls with just one or two mx bikes in it. Its like it is almost no suspension with a light load.
  10. ScottyR

    ScottyR Limited User

    Messages:
    2,928
    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2003
    Likes:
    6
    Town:
    Mitchell
    I ended up ordering a 5x8 all alluminum trailer with the ramp door, side door, roof vent and 5.5' int height. I also sprung for the alloy wheels and radial tires. I know I will miss my 6x12 but the gas expense is driving me nuts. I know that 2 bikes and gear will fit in the 5x8 and my wifes 6cyl van will be able to pull it when necessary.
  11. Joe

    Joe Limited User

    Messages:
    972
    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2004
    Likes:
    3
    Town:
    toronto
    I went the other way after looking at them all and went to the 7 by 12 v nose with a slope on the top. Side door and loading ramp back door. Doesn't bother the ram at all and only noticed it didn't get into 4 cylinders. Other than that it was great. For the amount of long hauling it will be doing the bigger size seemed to fit my needs more.
  12. ScottyR

    ScottyR Limited User

    Messages:
    2,928
    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2003
    Likes:
    6
    Town:
    Mitchell
    If I had a bad azz truck like yours I would go big as well. I have to pull a trailer up north to my parents cottage fairly regularly and using my wifes Gr Caravan makes more sense with kids, dog etc.. instead of jamming all our stuff in my truck. That was 99% of the reason for going a bit smaller. Her van even with the big V6 struggles to pull the 6 x12 at Hwy 400 speeds.
  13. Joe

    Joe Limited User

    Messages:
    972
    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2004
    Likes:
    3
    Town:
    toronto
    Well I wouldn't have the bad azz truck if I used it everyday . For me its a weekend toy hauler. Between the work truck the corolla and the Tucson I don't worry to much about gas mileage with the ram. Will say that for long trips without hammering on the hemi it gets really good gas mileage. The new 6 speed only gets you more tire roasting bottom power and nothing more for the mileage.
  14. Visser

    Visser Limited User

    Messages:
    270
    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2006
    Likes:
    53
    Town:
    Mississauga
    Sorry to bump up an old thread, but I thought that was better than creating a new one.

    Scotty, after all of these years how did that trailer work out for you?

    I currently use a 5x8 open tilt trailer, and with my little GMC Canyon 5sp 4cyl I notice almost no increase in fuel consumption with the bike on the trailer (10l/100km), and maybe an extra liter/100km (11 to 11.5l/100km) with the ATV on it. The truck wears a cap though, so likely most of the bike and atv's profile is somewhat blocked by the cap.

    I've been mulling over getting an enclosed trailer, but I think I would want a short/low-profile trailer that extends as little as possible (or not at all) outside of the truck's profile... I'm wondering if that will help against taking a huge hit in fuel economy?

    However, it looks like a 5.5' interior translates to a 7' exterior height, and a 5' interior translates to around 6.5' height... so unless I had a large truck, van or SUV as a tow vehicle I will not be able to use an enclosed trailer that is entirely blocked by the tow vehicle. Well, one of those tiny 4x6 might fit the bill, but then I wouldn't be able to fit my bike or ATV in the trailer, so kind of pointless.

    By the way, does a 5.5' interior enclosed fit in a standard garage, or would only a 5' interior model do so?

    Has anyone here had the opportunity to pull an enclosed trailer that was small enough to be covered by the tow vehicle and did that help with the fuel economy?

    I guess what I would need for the best aerodynamics, and therefore the best fuel economy, would be a tear drop cargo trailer -- or perhaps square front and tear drop rear end.

    Too bad this Road Toad Cargo Teardrop has only 3.5' interior height, rendering it useless for my purpose:

    [​IMG]


  15. Visser

    Visser Limited User

    Messages:
    270
    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2006
    Likes:
    53
    Town:
    Mississauga
  16. taylorericjohn

    taylorericjohn ODSC-OFTR Member

    Messages:
    412
    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2011
    Likes:
    18
    Town:
    Woodstock
    Pulling an enclosed trailer will hurt your mileage... It just will. Low and narrow will definitely help. I have always heard that the width will make as much difference as v-nose vs flat front. How you drive will also make a big difference. I pull a couple of different trailers that make up (last time I checked) just over 40% of the km on my truck. I pull a 6x12 tandem v-nose enclosed, 14' tent trailer , 12' single axle landscape and rarely a 5x10 single axle enclosed. Pulling the 6x12 with lets say 4000 lbs in it at 117-120kph I am around 21L/100km. Drop below 110kph I am looking closer to 18L/100km. Tent trailer loaded up with gear, food and beer for 3 and 3 bikes in the box I am sitting around 14.1-14.3 at 117-120kph.
    As a comparison if it's just the family and luggage no trailer heading down the highway at the same 117-120kph I am looking at around 9.4-9.6L/100km

    I would also think about how much of a difference the gas mileage is actually going to make in your life. Are you going to pull it alot? A couple of times a month in the summer? Long distances? Over 300km at a time?
  17. taylorericjohn

    taylorericjohn ODSC-OFTR Member

    Messages:
    412
    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2011
    Likes:
    18
    Town:
    Woodstock
  18. Visser

    Visser Limited User

    Messages:
    270
    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2006
    Likes:
    53
    Town:
    Mississauga
    True enough, for the few trips I take a year, having worse mileage for those trips won't make that much of a difference. That is the beauty of a trailer, I guess, vs a toy hauler van, in that you can leave the trailer at home for when you only truly need it.

    I do go riding one way or another nearly every weekend I can (March until November, anyway), but I don't need an enclosed trailer for most of that. Likely only 2 to 4 trips year could really use a covered ride... so the low 5x8 would likely be plenty.

    The only reason the open trailer might not suffice is because last February I did some legal winter ATVing on the Baysville area trails, but my ATV suffered for the open tow on the way home -- salt crap all over it, and no heated outside water at home to wash it off. That, and I'd like the convenience of a closed trailer to carry gear as well.
    taylorericjohn likes this.